Jesus and the End Time | End Time Texts in Gospel of Mark
Introductory Notes

On this Bible prophecy website page the writer provides an introductory preview of the complete version of a document titled "End Time Texts in Gospel of Mark" which shows and discusses End Times Teachings of Jesus described in the Gospel of Mark in the King James Bible (or KJV Bible). By providing this preview, the writer enables readers to quickly find out whether this document contains information of a kind they are interested in and, if so, whether it presents this information in a fair and unbiased manner. Readers who are satisfied that it does can then read and/or download the complete version of this document that is located under the Main End Time Files heading of the Table of Contents page of this website.

On this page the End Times teachings of Jesus are shown as sets of King James Bible verses or passages ("texts" for short) that quote, describe or otherwise clarify or explain these teachings. To save time and space, the writer will refer to verses of these kinds as "End Time texts". He will also do this because it has become a common practice for the popular apocalyptic literature and Bible prophecy websites to use the terms "End Time" and "End Times" (and variant forms like End-Time, End-Times, Endtime and Endtimes) instead of longer or more formal terms, such as the end of the world, time of the end, Day of the Lord, the Eschaton, the Parousia, etc. End Time-based terms are also useful as generic substitutes for the many different terms that Bible scholars use when they discuss teachings of Jesus about the End Times. The term End Time Judgment, for example, is a useful generic substitute for any of the many different terms, such as the Day of Judgment, Judgment Day, the Judgment, the Last Judgment and eternal damnation that scholars use when they discuss teachings of Jesus about a Judgment or Day of Reckoning. Similarly, the term End Time Kingdom is a useful generic substitute for any of the many different terms, such as the kingdom of God, kingdom of heaven, kingdom of the Son of man, kingdom prepared for you, and Gospel of the kingdom that scholars use when they discuss teachings of Jesus about a Kingdom of (or from) God where persons who are judged favorably at the End Time Judgment will enjoy their rewards.

Importantly, all End Time texts which include verses copied from the New Testament are followed by entries called Notes which cite and/or discuss other New or Old Testament texts that are related to them and, consequently, ought to be read and interpreted in conjunction with them. Especially important among texts of this kind are texts which include similar but differently worded accounts of things Jesus said on the same or similar subjects in other Gospels or in other parts of the same Gospel. Other examples of texts of this kind include Old Testament texts which Jesus quotes or alludes to in order to explain or support his sayings, prophecies and other teachings about the End Time. This is because reading these texts in conjunction with one another enables readers to study the End Times teachings or Eschatology of Jesus as a connected whole, and not just as a collection of separate stand-alone units.

End Time Teachings of Jesus in the Gospel of Mark

Mark 1:14-15
14 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God, 15 And saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel.
V. 15 is generally similar to v. 17 of Matt. 4:12-17 and v. 7 of Matt. 10:5-23. See also v. 9-10 of Luke 10:1-16.
This text is treated as an End Time text because v. 14 and 15 describe Jesus preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God and teaching that its time is at hand. The preaching of this kingdom is, in turn, of End Time interest because this kingdom seems to be the same as the kingdom Jesus speaks about in Mark 9:1, v. 28 of Matt. 16:24-28, v. 27 of Luke 9:23-27 and v. 31 of Luke 21:25-37. It also seems to be the same as the "kingdom prepared for you" that Jesus speaks about in his description of the End Time Judgment, i.e., in v. 34 of Matt. 25:31-46. If these kingdoms are the same, then it is reasonable to think of the kingdom Jesus speaks about in v. 14-15 as an End Time kingdom.
Other passages which describe Jesus preaching the kingdom of God include Luke 8:1, v. 2 of Luke 9:1-6 and v. 9 and 11 of Luke 10:1-16. In the Gospel of Matthew this kingdom is usually referred to as "the kingdom of heaven". See, for example, v. 17 of Matt. 4: 12-17 and v. 7 of Matt.10:5-23.
V. 15 is the first verse in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus uses the word "kingdom". In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Kingdom", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible usually uses this word and gives examples of Bible verses that use it in these senses. See also the Special Note included below.
The events events that Mark describes in v. 14-15 above seem to be a shorter version of the events that Matthew describes in Matt. 4:12-17. See also Luke 8:1.
Special Note on "the Kingdom":
The Bible often uses the phrase "the kingdom of God" interchangeably with phrases like "the kingdom of heaven" and "the kingdom of the Lord". It also often abbreviates phrases of this kind to any of several shorter phrases, such as "the kingdom", "his kingdom" and "thy kingdom". As explained in the Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Kingdom", the Bible may use phrases of this kind in senses in which it means things as different as a people (Exod. 19:5-6), a place on the earth (1Chron. 28:5), a place not on the earth (John 18:36) and God's rule over all things (Ps. 103:19).

Mark 2:3-12
3 And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four. 4 And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay. 5 When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee. 6 But there were certain of the scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts, 7 Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only? 8 And immediately when Jesus perceived in his spirit that they so reasoned within themselves, he said unto them, Why reason ye these things in your hearts? 9 Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk? 10 But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (he saith to the sick of the palsy,) 11 I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy bed, and go thy way into thine house. 12 And immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, We never saw it on this fashion.
V. 10-11 above are the first verses in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus seems to refer to himself as "the Son of man". In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of Phrases Like Son of Man", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible uses phrases of this kind ("a son of man", "the son of man", etc.) and gives examples of Bible verses that use them in these senses.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 10-12 describe Jesus speaking about himself as the Son of man, and as having the power to forgive sins. The first part of v. 10 is of End Time interest because v. 26-27 of Mark 13:24-32 describe the Son of man coming in a cloud (v. 26) and gathering his elect from the four winds for what appears to be the End Time Judgment. The second part of v. 10 is of End Time interest because the power to forgive is an aspect of the power to judge, and because the teachings of Jesus about the Day of Judgment (or Last Judgment) make clear that the Son of man will exercise the power to judge. See, for example, v. 31-34 of Matt. 25:31-46 and v. 27 of John 5:19-29.
V. 3-12 above generally correspond to Matt. 9:1-8 and Luke 5:18-25.

Mark 3:22-30
P 22 And the scribes which came down from Jerusalem said, He hath Beelzebub, and by the prince of the devils casteth he out devils. 23 And he called them unto him, and said unto them in parables, How can Satan cast out Satan? 24 And if a kingdom be divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. 25 And if a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand. 26 And if Satan rise up against himself, and be divided, he cannot stand, but hath an end. 27 No man can enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he will first bind the strong man; and then he will spoil his house. 28 Verily I say unto you, All sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme: 29 But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation: 30 Because they said, He hath an unclean spirit. [end par.]
This text is of End Time interest because v. 22 describes Jesus speaking about Beelzebub (Satan in v. 23) as "the prince of the devils", a phrase that foreshadows his use of "the devil and his angels" in v. 41 of his description of the End Time Judgment, Matt. 25:31-46.
The Beelzebub mentioned in v. 22 seems to be the same as the Baal-Zebub that is mentioned in four and only four verses of the Old Testament. These four verses include v. 2-3 and 6 of 2Kings 1:2-6 and v. 16 of 2Kings 1:7-16.
V. 22-27 above are generally similar to Luke 11:14-22. They are also roughly similar to Matt. 12:24-29.
V. 28-29 above roughly correspond to Matt. 12:31-32 and to v. 10 of Luke 12:8-10. In the latter, however, Jesus explicitly says that those who speak against the Son of man may be forgiven.
V. 29 above is the first and only verse in either the Old or New Testaments of the KJV Bible that uses the words eternal damnation as such. Interestingly, the words everlasting punishment are also used as such only once in the KJV Bible, in v. 46 of Matt. 25:31-46, i.e., in Matthew's description of the End Time Judgment. The meanings of these words are discussed at length on the web page and on the downloadable file titled "Notes on Everlasting Punishment".
Because v. 23 describes the things Jesus teaches in this text as parables, and because v. 28-29 describes teachings of Jesus about eternal damnation, it is reasonable to think of this text as one of the End Times parables of Jesus.

Mark 4:14-20
P 14 The sower soweth the word. 15 And these are they by the way side, where the word is sown; but when they have heard, Satan cometh immediately, and taketh away the word that was sown in their hearts. 16 And these are they likewise which are sown on stony ground; who, when they have heard the word, immediately receive it with gladness; 17 And have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time: afterward, when affliction or persecution ariseth for the word's sake, immediately they are offended. 18 And these are they which are sown among thorns; such as hear the word, 19 And the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful. 20 And these are they which are sown on good ground; such as hear the word, and receive it, and bring forth fruit, some thirtyfold, some sixty, and some an hundred. [end par.]
In v. 14-20 above, Jesus further explains the parable he tells in Mark 4:1-9 above and begins to suggest its End Time significance. He does this, in part, by revealing that the seed he spoke of in Mark 4:1-9 is "the word", a phrase he uses at least once in each verse. He also does this, in part, by revealing that Satan is an opponent of this word. Because this text does not make clear what he means by "the word", however, its End Time significance remains open to interpretation.
The parable of v. 14-20 above is generally similar to that told at Matt. 13:18-23 and Luke 8:11-15. Interestingly, in Matthew's version, Jesus suggests that the seed is the "word of the kingdom" (Matt. 13:19). In Luke's version, on the other hand, Jesus clearly states that the seed is "the word of God" (Luke 8:11). Of these, Matthew's term "word of the kingdom" is of greater End Time interest because it its similarity to the term "gospel of the kingdom" in v. 14 of Matt. 24:1-22.
Unlike its Matthean counterpart (Matt. 13:18-23), the parable of v. 14-20 above is not followed by any of the three very graphic descriptions of the End Time Judgment that Jesus gives at Matt. 13:24-30, Matt. 13:36-43 and Matt. 13:47-50. It is, however, soon followed by an End Time parable that likens the coming of Kingdom of God to the coming of a harvest, an idea which is of End Time interest because it clearly suggests that this kingdom is an End Time kingdom. See Mark 4:26-29 below.

Mark 4:21-25
P 21 And he said unto them, Is a candle brought to be put under a bushel, or under a bed? and not to be set on a candlestick? 22 For there is nothing hid, which shall not be manifested; neither was any thing kept secret, but that it should come abroad. 23 If any man have ears to hear, let him hear. 24 And he said unto them, Take heed what ye hear: with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you: and unto you that hear shall more be given. 25 For he that hath, to him shall be given: and he that hath not, from him shall be taken even that which he hath. [end par.]
V. 22 is of End Time interest because it suggests that all of a person's good and evil acts will be made known and considered at the time he is judged. This verse is very similar to v. 17 of Luke 8:16-18. See also v. 26 of Matt. 10:26-31.
This text is treated as an End Time text because v. 24 seems to describe a teaching of Jesus about how people will be judged at the End Time Judgment. See the generally similar teachings of Jesus described in v. 2 of Matt. 7:1-5 and v. 38 of Luke 6:35-42.
V. 21-25 as a whole are generally similar to Luke 8:16-18, but have no obvious counterpart in the Gospel of Matthew.
V. 25 is very similar to v. 29 of Matt. 25:14-30 of the Matthean discourse. See also v. 26 of Luke 19:11-27.

Mark 4:26-29
P 26 And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground; 27 And should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. 28 For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. 29 But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is come. [end par.]
V. 26-29 are included as an End Time text because they describe teachings of Jesus about the time of the coming of the kingdom of God. Specifically, they describe him teaching that the kingdom of God will come like the coming of a harvest, i.e., immediately after the seed (the word he describes as sown/preached in Mark 4:14-20) brings forth its fruit. This idea is confirmed by v. 14 of Matt. 24:1-22 of Matthew's End Time discourse, in which Jesus teaches that the end of the world will come when the gospel of the kingdom has been preached in all the world. See also v. 10 of Mark 13:1-20.
The idea that the harvest Jesus speaks of in v. 29 is a veiled reference to the end of the world is confirmed by v. 39 of Matt. 13:36-43, in which Jesus explicitly associates these terms and describes the reapers as angels. The fact that v. 26 describes Jesus associating these terms with the term "kingdom of God" further supports the idea, suggested in connection with Mark 1:14-15 above, that Jesus thought of the kingdom of God as an End Time kingdom.

Mark 6:7-13
P 7 And he called unto him the twelve, and began to send them forth by two and two; and gave them power over unclean spirits; 8 And commanded them that they should take nothing for their journey, save a staff only; no scrip, no bread, no money in their purse: 9 But be shod with sandals; and not put on two coats. 10 And he said unto them, In what place soever ye enter into an house, there abide till ye depart from that place. 11 And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear you, when ye depart thence, shake off the dust under your feet for a testimony against them. Verily I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrha in the day of judgment, than for that city. 12 And they went out, and preached that men should repent. 13 And they cast out many devils, and anointed with oil many that were sick, and healed them.
This text is treated as an End Time text because v. 11 describes Jesus teaching that there is a relationship between how people receive his followers and how they will be judged on the Day of Judgment. In v. 40-46 of Matt. 25:31-46 of Matthew's End Time discourse, Jesus seems to confirm this by teaching that believing and helping him or "the least of these my brethren" (a term he seems to use narrowly to mean only followers---even low-ranking followers) is a criterion that will be used at the End Time Judgment. Interestingly, this narrow reading of v. 11 is further supported by Jesus' use of the words "one of these little ones that believe in me" in an equally dire context in v. 42 of Mark 9:41-48 below.
Jesus' use of the words "receive you" and "hear you" in v. 11 arguably parallel the things he says about receiving and hearing "the word" in v. 16 and 20 of Mark 4:14-20 above. This suggests that Jesus is sending the disciples as sowers of "the word". That this word is the good news that the kingdom of God is at hand and that people should prepare for it by practicing repentance is suggested by v. 12 and by Mark 1:14-15 above. See also v. 23 of Matt. 10:5-23.
V. 7-13 are similar to v. 5-15 of Matt. 10:5-23, except that they do not include verses that correspond to v. 6-8 and part of v. 5 thereof. While Mark's account of the sending out of the twelve ends with v. 13, Matthew's account is much longer and continues not only through v. 23 of Matt. 10:5-23, but also through v. 42 of Matt. 10:37-42, before Matthew speaks about its end in Matt. 11:1. Interestingly, several of the passages that appear in the later part of Matthew's much longer account seem to have less to do with further describing the sending out of the twelve than with further describing the teachings of Jesus about the End Time Judgment.
V. 7-13 are generally similar to Luke 9:1-6, except that the latter does not mention either Sodom or the day of judgment. Luke does, however, mention both in the description of the sending out of seventy followers that appears at Luke 10:1-16.

Mark 8:34-9:1
P 34 And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. 35 For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel's, the same shall save it. 36 For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? 37 Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? 38 Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation; of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. [Ch. 9] P 1 And he said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That there be some of them that stand here, which shall not taste of death, till they have seen the kingdom of God come with power. [end par.]
This text as a whole generally corresponds to Matt. 16:24-28 and Luke 9:23-27.
This text is a prime example of an End Time Kingdom text. This is because v. 38 describes teachings of Jesus about the coming of the Son of man, and because v. 9:1 contains an unusually clear End Time prophecy of Jesus about the kingdom of God, namely, that it will come with power before the deaths of some of those to whom he is speaking.
The things Jesus teaches in v. 38 about the Son of man coming in the glory of his Father with holy angels are generally similar to the things he teaches in v. 30 of Matt. 24:29-36, v. 26 of Mark 13:24-32 and v. 27 of Luke 21:25-37 of the End Time discourses. They are also similar to the things Jesus says during his trial before the high priest. See v. 64 of Matt. 26:62-66, v. 62 of Mark 14:60-64 and v. 69 of Luke 22:66-71.
V. 34-35 above are generally similar to v. 24-25 of Matt. 16:24-28 and v. 23-24 of Luke 9:23-27. They are also similar to v. 38-39 of Matt. 10:37-42.
V. 36-37 above are very similar to v. 26 of Matt. 16:24-28. V. 36-37 are also similar to v. 25 of Luke 9:23-27, except that the latter ends with the words "lose himself, or be cast away?".
Except for its use of "this adulterous and sinful generation", v. 38 is similar to Luke 9:26. The most nearly similar verse in the Gospel of Matthew, Matt. 16:27, says only that the Son of man shall come in the glory of his father and "reward every man according to his works.". The first part of v. 38 also seems similar to Matt. 10:32-33 and Luke 12:8-9.
The words "this...sinful generation" in v. 38 are a variation on the words "this generation" in v. 12 of Mark 8:11-13.
The middle part of v. 9:1 is repeated, almost word for word, in Matt. 16:28 and Luke 9:27. Interestingly, the parallelism between these verses suggests that seeing the coming of the kingdom of God with power (v. 9:1) means essentially the same thing as seeing the Son of man coming in his kingdom (Matt. 16:28) and seeing the kingdom of God (Luke 9:27).
The statement in v. 9:1 and its Matthean and Lukan counterparts, Matt. 16:28 and Luke 9:27, that some standing here shall not taste of death till they see the coming they speak of seem to convey generally the same idea as v. 34 of Matt. 24:29-36, v. 30 of Mark 13:24-32 and v. 32 of Luke 21:25-37 of the End Time discourses, although the latter all use "this generation" to describe the people they speak of. Because the identity of these people has important implications, the meanings of the phrases used to describe them (especially "this generation") are discussed at length in Notes included in the End Time Discourse Files.

Mark 9:41-48
41 For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name, because ye belong to Christ, verily I say unto you, he shall not lose his reward. 42 And whosoever shall offend one of these little ones that believe in me, it is better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he were cast into the sea. 43 And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched: 44 Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched. 45 And if thy foot offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter halt into life, than having two feet to be cast into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched: 46 Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched. 47 And if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out: it is better for thee to enter into the kingdom of God with one eye, than having two eyes to be cast into hell fire: 48 Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched.
The teachings of Jesus described in v. 41-42 above are very similar to those described in v. 42 of Matt. 10:37-42, except that the latter describes water being given in the name of a disciple. See also v. 34-35 and 40 of Jesus' description of the End Time Judgment, Matt. 25:31-46.
This text is included as an End Time text because it describes teachings of Jesus about the rewards and punishments that await those who help "these little ones that believe in me" (v. 41-42) and those who do not (v. 42-48). As suggested in connection with v. 11 of Mark 6:7-13 above, Jesus seems to use "these little ones" narrowly to refer to his followers---even his lowest-ranking followers---not to children. This may also be true in the case of Jesus' use of the words "the least of these my brethren" and "the least of these" in v. 35 and 40 of Matt. 25:31-46 of Matthew's End Time discourse.
The correctness of the writer's suggestion about the identities of the persons mentioned in the previous Note is supported by the fact that v. 41-42 of Mark 9:41-48 immediately follows a passage (Mark 9:38-40) in which Jesus speaks about non-followers who cast out devils but says nothing about children, and that Mark 9:41-48 as a whole is not clearly related to an earlier passage (Mark 9:36-37) in which Jesus speaks about children, but in a different context. See also Mark 10:13-16. Interestingly, the most nearly similar text in the Gospel of Matthew, Matt. 18:2-9, does not say anything about casting out devils, and clearly associates the "little children" of Matt. 9:4-5 with the "little ones" of Matt. 9:6.
Another text which describes Jesus speaking about cutting off body parts to avoid being cast into hell, Matt. 5:27-32, has a context which condemns adultery but says nothing about either "little children" or "little ones". In addition, in v. 2 of Luke 17:1-2, Jesus says essentially the same thing about "these little ones" that he says in v. 42 above, but says it without saying anything about cutting off body parts or being cast into hell.
V. 43 is the first verse in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus uses the word "hell" as such. In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Hell", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible as a whole uses this word and gives examples of Bible verses that use them in these senses.
This text is important because v. 43, 45 and 47 are the first verses of the Gospel of Mark which describe teachings of Jesus about hell and/or hell fire (hellfire in American English). Specifically, they describe Jesus teaching that hell is a place of punishment by a fire that shall never be quenched, that this is a punishment which death may not bring to an end, and that entering hell or the kingdom of God are mutually exclusive future destinies (v. 47).
V. 43 and 47 generally correspond to v. 30 and 29, respectively, of Matt. 5:27-32. V. 43, 45 and 47 also correspond to v. 8 and 9 of Matt. 18:2-9. Neither of these Matthean texts, however, includes verses that correspond to v. 44, 46 and 48.
V. 44, 46 and 48 are identical. These verses all seem to be based on v. 24 of Is. 66:15-24. The significance of the latter text is discussed at length in the Main End Time File titled "Notes on Everlasting Punishment".
Special Note Other Translations:
Interestingly, v. 44 and v. 46 above are absent from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible (NRSV). In copies of the latter published by Division of Christian Education of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the U. S. A., their absence is explained by saying that these two verses are "lacking in the best ancient authorities."

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