Jesus and the End Time | End Time Texts in Gospel of Luke
Introductory Notes

On this Bible prophecy website page the writer provides an introductory preview of the complete version of a document titled "End Time Texts in Gospel of Luke" which shows and discusses End Times Teachings of Jesus described in the Gospel of Luke in the King James Bible (or KJV Bible). By providing this preview, the writer enables readers to quickly find out whether this document contains information of a kind they are interested in and, if so, whether it presents this information in a fair and unbiased manner. Readers who are satisfied that it does can then read and/or download the complete version of this document that is located under the Main End Time Files heading of the Table of Contents page of this website.

On this page the writer presents the End Times teachings of Jesus by showing sets of King James Bible passages or verses ("texts" for short) that quote, describe or otherwise clarify or explain these teachings. To save time and space, the writer will distinguish Bible texts that present teachings of Jesus about the End Time from Bible texts that don't by referring to them as End Time texts. Similarly, he will distinguish Bible texts that present teachings of Jesus about a time of Judgment associated with the End Time (e.g., the Day of Judgment, Judgment Day, the Last Judgment, the Days of Vengeance, wrath to come, etc.) from Bible texts that don't by referring to them as End Time Judgment texts. Finally, he will distinguish Bible texts that present teachings of Jesus about a kingdom associated with the End Time (e.g., the kingdom of God, the kingdom of heaven, the kingdom of the Son of man, the kingdom prepared for you, etc.) from Bible texts that don't by referring to them as End Time Kingdom texts. When the writer refers to or discusses such a Judgment or Kingdom in general terms, without referring to any particular Bible text, however, he will refer to them simply as the End Time Judgment or End Time Kingdom. These and other specifics of the writer's use of the terms End Time and End Times are discussed more fully on the Introduction page of this website.

Importantly, all End Time texts which include verses copied from the New Testament are followed by entries called Notes which cite and/or discuss other New or Old Testament texts that are related to them and, consequently, ought to be read and interpreted in conjunction with them. Especially important among texts of this kind are texts which include similar but differently worded accounts of things Jesus said on the same or similar subjects in other Gospels or in other parts of the same Gospel. Other examples of texts of this kind include Old Testament texts which Jesus quotes or alludes to in order to explain or support his sayings, prophecies and other teachings about the End Time. This is because reading these texts in conjunction with one another enables readers to study the End Times teachings or Eschatology of Jesus as a connected whole, and not just as a collection of separate stand-alone units.

Texts Describing the Infancy of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke

Luke 1:26-33
26 And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth, 27 To a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the virgin's name was Mary. 28 And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women. 29 And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be. 30 And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favour with God. 31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus. 32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: 33 And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 32-33 speak of Jesus as a king who will reign for ever (forever in American English) and have a kingdom that will have no end. Because this kingdom will have no end, it is reasonable to think of it as a kingdom which falls within the meaning of the term End Time Kingdom.
The father-son relationship described by the words "the Son of the Highest" in v. 32 seems to parallel that mentioned in v. 14 of 2Sam. 7:8-17, v. 13 of 1Chron. 17:7-15 and v. 10 of 1Chron. 22:7-10, among others. See also v. 14 of Is. 7:10-16.
V. 32's references to the throne of David and to a reign that will continue for ever seem to allude to v. 6-7 of Is. 9:1-21.
The words "the Son of the Highest" in v. 32 arguably foreshadow the question Jesus is asked during his trial before the high (or chief) priest(s). See v. 63 of Matt. 26:62-66, v. 61 of Mark 14:60-64 and v. 70 of Luke 22:66-71.
The reigning over the house of Jacob mentioned in v. 33 seems to correspond to that mentioned in v. 5-7 of 1Chron. 28: 2-8. Ominously, these words seem to support the charge that Pilate makes at Jesus' trial. See v. 11 of Matt. 27:11-14, v. 2 of Mark 15:1-5 and v. 3 of Luke 23:1-4.

Teachings of John the Baptist in the Gospel of Luke

Luke 3:1-9
1 Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene, 2 Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness. 3 And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; 4 As it is written in the book of the words of Esaias the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. 5 Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways shall be made smooth; 6 And all flesh shall see the salvation of God. 7 Then said he to the multitude that came forth to be baptized of him, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 8 Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and begin not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, That God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. 9 And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: every tree therefore which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 7-9 speak of the wrath to come, and of the fiery punishment that awaits those who have not brought forth "fruits worthy of repentance" or "good fruit". Together these verses clearly seem to refer to one outcome of the event the writer refers to as the End Time Judgment.
While the KJV Bible does not describe Jesus using the words "wrath to come" as such, it does describe him using arguably similar terms. See, for example, his use of "days of vengeance" in v. 22 of Luke 21:5-24 and his use of the words "days" and "wrath" in the same verse in v. 23 of Luke 21:5-24.
V. 4-5 are quoted from v. 3-4 of Is. 40:1-11. V. 6 paraphrases v. 5 of Is. 40:1-11, which states that the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and that all flesh shall see it together.
V. 7's use of "generation of vipers" and "wrath to come" seem to foreshadow Jesus' use of "generation of vipers" and "day of judgment" in v. 34 and 36 of Matt. 12:33-37. See also v. 33 of Matt. 23:29-39.
V. 9's statement about casting into fire is similar to the one Jesus makes in v. 19 of Matt. 7:15-20. Jesus expands on this idea in Mark 9:41-48, which portrays him describing this fire as a fire that will never be quenched and that is to be understood as the fire of hell (Mark 9:43 and 45) or hell fire (Mark 9:47). See also v. 6 of John 15:1-6.
V. 4-9 above are generally similar to v. 3-10 of Matt. 3:7-12, but have no counterparts in the Gospels of Mark or John.

Luke 3:15-17
15 And as the people were in expectation, and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not; 16 John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire: 17 Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and will gather the wheat into his garner; but the chaff he will burn with fire unquenchable.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 17 describes John using harvest imagery to speak of the two very different future destinies that await people at the End Time Judgment. Jesus uses similar imagery to make similar statements in v. 30 of Matt. 13:24-30 and in v. 39-40 of Matt. 13:36-43.
The punishment John describes in v. 17 would seem to be generally similar to the punishment Jesus describes at v. 28-30 of Luke 17:26-37.
V. 16-17 above are generally similar to v. 11-12 of Matt. 3:7-12, but have no counterparts in the Gospels of Mark or John.

End Time Teachings of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke

Luke 4:16-21
P 16 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read. 17 And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he had opened the book, he found the place where it was written, 18 The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, 19 To preach the acceptable year of the Lord. 20 And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. 21 And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 18-19 describe Jesus quoting from v. 1 and the first part of v. 2 of Is. 61:1-11. This, in turn, important because Is. 61:2 goes on to proclaim "the day of vengeance of our God". Other King James Bible Old Testament texts that use "day of vengeance" include v. 4 of Is. 63:3-9 and v. 10 of Jer. 46:9-12.
The words of v. 18 are strikingly similar to those included in v. 1 and 7 of Is. 42:1-7. Because the latter text repeatedly mentions the bringing forth or setting of "judgment", it is reasonable to regard it as an End Time Judgment text.
The End Time significance of "the day of vengeance" is confirmed by v. 22 of Luke 21:5-24 of the Lukan End Time discourse, in which Jesus says, "These be the days of vengeance, that all things which are written may be fulfilled."
Surprisingly, in spite of the importance of this text as a description of the formal announcement of the beginning of Jesus' public ministry, there are no corresponding texts in the other three Gospels.
In v. 18 Jesus describes himself as anointed to preach the gospel to the poor. That this gospel is closely associated with the idea of the kingdom of God seems clear from Luke 6:20-25. See also Mark 1:14-15 and v. 17 of Matt. 4:12-17, among others. In addition, the anointing of Jesus by God makes him the bearer of a kingly title, the Lord's anointed. Together, these things suggest that this text is an End Time Kingdom text.

Luke 4:40-44
P 40 Now when the sun was setting, all they that had any sick with divers diseases brought them unto him; and he laid his hands on every one of them, and healed them. 41 And devils also came out of many, crying out, and saying, Thou art Christ the Son of God. And he rebuking them suffered them not to speak: for they knew that he was Christ. 42 And when it was day, he departed and went into a desert place: and the people sought him, and came unto him, and stayed him, that he should not depart from them. 43 And he said unto them, I must preach the kingdom of God to other cities also: for therefore am I sent. 44 And he preached in the synagogues of Galilee. [end ch.]
V. 41 above is one of the few verses in the Gospels and Acts that uses "Christ" and "the Son of God" in the same verse. Like other verses of this kind, it is spoken to or about Jesus, but not by him. See, for example, verses that include statements made by a Gospel writer (Mark 1:1-11/1 and John 20:31*), verses that include questions Jesus is asked at his trial (Matt. 26:62-66/63 and Mark 14:60-64/61) and verses that include things individuals say to Jesus in private (John 6:69* and John 11:21-27/27). [* not included]
V. 43 is of End Time interest because v. 25-31 of Luke 21:25-37 of Luke's End Time discourse describe Jesus saying that the kingdom of God will be nigh at hand when men see "these things" (v. 31), and because "these things" refer back to things that include signs in the heavens (v. 25) and to the coming of the Son of man in a cloud (v. 26). See also Matt. 24:14. This idea is confirmed by Matt. 24:29-36 of Matthew's End Time discourse, which describe Jesus using the similar words "all these things" (Matt. 24:33) to refer back to things that include heavenly sights (Matt. 24:29) and the coming of the Son of man (Matt. 24:30) which will be seen when the summer (or kingdom) is nigh. See also Mark 13:24-29. It is therefore reasonable to think of the kingdom Jesus speaks of in v. 43 as an End Time Kingdom.
Other verses which describe the preaching of the kingdom of God include Luke 8:1, v. 2 of Luke 9:1-6 and v. 9 and 11 of Luke 10:1-16 and v. 15 of Mark 1:14-15. In the Gospel of Matthew this kingdom is usually referred to as "the kingdom of heaven". See v. 17 of Matt. 4: 12-17 and v. 7 of Matt.10:5-23.
V. 43 is the first verse in the Gospel of Luke in which Jesus uses the phrase "the kingdom of God". In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Kingdom", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible uses the word "kingdom" and gives examples of Bible verses that use it in these senses.
Special Note on "the Kingdom":
The Bible often uses the phrase "the kingdom of God" interchangeably with phrases like "the kingdom of heaven" and "the kingdom of the Lord". It also often abbreviates phrases of this kind to any of several shorter phrases, such as "the kingdom", "his kingdom" and "thy kingdom". As explained in the Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Kingdom", the Bible may use phrases of this kind in senses in which it means things as different as a people (Exod. 19:5-6), a place on the earth (1Chron. 28:5), a place not on the earth (John 18:36) and God's kingship over any and all places.

Luke 5:18-25
P 18 And, behold, men brought in a bed a man which was taken with a palsy: and they sought means to bring him in, and to lay him before him. 19 And when they could not find by what way they might bring him in because of the multitude, they went upon the housetop, and let him down through the tiling with his couch into the midst before Jesus. 20 And when he saw their faith, he said unto him, Man, thy sins are forgiven thee. 21 And the scribes and the Pharisees began to reason, saying, Who is this which speaketh blasphemies? Who can forgive sins, but God alone? 22 But when Jesus perceived their thoughts, he answering said unto them, What reason ye in your hearts? 23 Whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Rise up and walk? 24 But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power upon earth to forgive sins, (he said unto the sick of the palsy,) I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy couch, and go into thine house. 25 And immediately he rose up before them, and took up that whereon he lay, and departed to his own house, glorifying God.
This text is treated as an End Time text because v. 24 describes Jesus speaking of himself as the Son of man, and as having the power to forgive sins. The first part of v. 24 seems to be of End Time significance because v. 27 and 36 of Luke 21:25-37 describe the Son of man coming in a cloud (v. 27) and, arguably, having persons being judged stand before him (v. 36). The second part of v. 24 is of End Time significance because the power to forgive is an aspect of the power to judge. See v. 35 of John 3:31-36 and v. 27 of John 5:19-29. See also v. 27 of Matt. 11:25-27.
V. 24 above is the first verse in the Gospel of Luke in which Jesus seems to refer to himself as "the Son of man". In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of Phrases Like Son of Man", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible uses phrases of this kind ("a son of man", "the son of man", etc.) and gives examples of Bible verses that use them in these senses.
In spite of numerous differences in wording, v. 18-25 generally correspond to Matt. 9:1-8 and Mark 2:3-12. Matthew, for example, describes Jesus speaking of people thinking evil in their hearts (Matt. 9:4), while Luke and Mark describe him speaking of people reasoning in their hearts (v. 22 above and Mark 2:8).

Luke 6:20-25
P 20 And he lifted up his eyes on his disciples, and said, Blessed be ye poor: for yours is the kingdom of God. 21 Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh. 22 Blessed are ye, when men shall hate you, and when they shall separate you from their company, and shall reproach you, and cast out your name as evil, for the Son of man's sake. 23 Rejoice ye in that day, and leap for joy: for, behold, your reward is great in heaven: for in the like manner did their fathers unto the prophets. 24 But woe unto you that are rich! for ye have received your consolation. 25 Woe unto you that are full! for ye shall hunger. Woe unto you that laugh now! for ye shall mourn and weep.
This text is included as an End Time text because it describes Jesus talking about the joy the Blessed will experience in the kingdom of God in the future (v. 20-21) and the great rewards they will enjoy in heaven (v. 23). For both of these reasons it is reasonable to think of this text as an End Time Kingdom text.
This text is also included because it describes two mutually exclusive future destinies, one for the poor and one for the rich. In addition, v. 23 describes Jesus saying that these destinies will begin to be experienced on "that day", a term the KJV Bible often uses to refer to the Day of Judgment, e.g., v. 12 of Luke 10:1-16, v. 31 of Luke 17:26-37 and v. 34 of Luke 21:25-37. As a result it is also reasonable to think of this text as an End Time Judgment text.
This text is also included as an End Time text because v. 20 and v. 25 seem to be related to verses that appear in the Matthean End Time discourse. Specifically, v. 20 seems to be related to v. 34 of Matt. 25:31-46 of that discourse because both verses involve persons who Jesus describes as "blessed" and who receive a kingdom given by God. Similarly, v. 25 seems to be related to v. 51 of Matt. 24:37-51 of the Matthean discourse because mourning and weeping seem to refer to the same mental state as weeping and gnashing of teeth.
V. 23 above is the first verse in the Gospel of Luke in which Jesus uses the word "heaven" in a sense in which it refers to a place where the blessed are rewarded. In one earlier verse, Luke 4:25 (not included), Jesus uses "heaven" to refer to the place from which rain falls. In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of the Word Heaven", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible uses the word "heaven" and gives examples of Bible verses that use it in these senses.
V. 20-25 include words that Jesus speaks on a plain. These words seem roughly similar to those of Matt. 5:1-12, a text that is often referred to as "the Sermon on the Mount" because Matt. 5:1 describes Jesus delivering it on a mountain.
V. 24 is only one of many verses in which Jesus speaks ominously about the fate of the rich. See, for example, Luke 16:19-31. See also v. 23-24 of Matt. 19:16-26, v. 23-25 of Mark 10:17-27 and v. 24-25 of Luke 18:18-27.

Luke 6:35-42
35 But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil. 36 Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful. 37 Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven: 38 Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again. 39 And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch? 40 The disciple is not above his master: but every one that is perfect shall be as his master. 41 And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye? 42 Either how canst thou say to thy brother, Brother, let me pull out the mote that is in thine eye, when thou thyself beholdest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, cast out first the beam out of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see clearly to pull out the mote that is in thy brother's eye.
The "children of the Highest" mentioned in v. 35 would seem to be the same as the "children of light" mentioned in v. 8 of Luke 16:8-13 and v. 36 of John 12:23-36, and the "children of God" mentioned in Matt. 5:9, Luke 20:36 and John 11:52. They also seem to be the same as the "children of the kingdom" mentioned in v. 38 of Matt. 13:36-43. See, however, v. 12 of Matt. 8:10-12.
Surprisingly, while the Old Testament does not use any of the phrases mentioned in the previous Note, it does use the phrase "children of Israel" hundreds of times. It also includes numerous verses that seem to contrast the latter phrase with "children (or men or sons) of Belial". See, for example, Deut. 13:13, Judg. 20:13, v. 12 of 1Sam. 2:11-12 and v. 7 of 2Chron. 13:6-8.
This text is of End Time interest because v.  35-36 describe Jesus' teachings about God and the things he expects from those who want to be rewarded by him. In addition, v. 37-38 describe Jesus' teachings about the criteria God uses to judge people. Both of these teachings seem intended to instruct people how to prepare for the End Time Judgment.
The last part of v. 37 seems to be generally similar to Matt. 6:14-15, Matt. 18:34-35 and Mark 11:25-26, among others.
The words Jesus speaks in v. 37-38 seem to be similar to those he speaks in v. 1-2 of Matt. 7:1-5 and v. 24 of Mark 4:21-25.
V. 41-42 above are generally similar to v. 4-5 of Matt. 7:1-5.

Luke 7:19-23
P 19 And John calling unto him two of his disciples sent them to Jesus, saying, Art thou he that should come? or look we for another? 20 When the men were come unto him, they said, John the Baptist hath sent us unto thee, saying, Art thou he that should come? or look we for another? 21 And in that same hour he cured many of their infirmities and plagues, and of evil spirits; and unto many that were blind he gave sight. 22 Then Jesus answering said unto them, Go your way, and tell John what things ye have seen and heard; how that the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, to the poor the gospel is preached. 23 And blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me. [end par.]
This text is an End Time text because v. 22 describes Jesus giving an affirmative, if brief and indirect, answer to John's question about whether he is the one "that should come". Based on the words he uses in v. 22, Jesus seems to answer by alluding to and combining parts of Is. 42:1-7 and Is 61:1-11, both of which speak of a person upon whom God has placed his Spirit. Is. 61:1, for example, speaks of his preaching "good tidings" (i.e., the gospel) to the meek, but say nothing about healings. Is. 42:7, on the other hand, speaks of his opening the eyes of the blind, and bringing out the prisoners from the prison and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house, but say nothing about his preaching good tidings.
The End Time significance of the Old Testament texts discussed in the previous Note is that both seem to associate the one to come with an End Time Judgment. V. 1 and 3-4 of Is. 42:1-7, for example, all speak about his bringing forth or setting judgment, while v. 2 of Is. 61:1-11 speaks about his proclaiming the day of vengeance of our God.
This text is also of End Time interest because v. 23 describes Jesus using two words, "blessed" and "offend", that he often uses in his teachings about the End Time Judgment. See, for example, his use of "blessed" in v. 34 of Matt. 25:31-46 and his use of "offend" in v. 41 of Matt. 13:36-43.
V. 22-23 are generally similar to Matt. 11:1-6. In fact, v. 23 is repeated, word for word, in v. 6 of Matt. 11:1-6.
It is unclear how the things John says in v. 19 are to be reconciled with the things he says in John 1:26-34 (not included).

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