Jesus and the End Time | End Time Texts in Gospel of John
Introductory Notes

On this Bible prophecy website page the writer provides an introductory preview of the complete version of a document titled "End Time Texts in Gospel of John" which shows and discusses End Times Teachings of Jesus described in the Gospel of John in the King James Bible (or KJV Bible). By providing this preview, the writer enables readers to quickly find out whether this document contains information of a kind they are interested in and, if so, whether it presents this information in a fair and unbiased manner. Readers who are satisfied that it does can then read and/or download the complete version of this document that is located under the Main End Time Files heading of the Table of Contents page of this website.

On this page the End Times teachings of Jesus are shown as sets of King James Bible verses or passages ("texts" for short) that quote, describe or otherwise clarify or explain these teachings. To save time and space, the writer will refer to verses of these kinds as "End Time texts". He will also do this because it has become a common practice for the popular apocalyptic literature and Bible prophecy websites to use the terms "End Time" and "End Times" (and variant forms like End-Time, End-Times, Endtime and Endtimes) instead of longer or more formal terms, such as the end of the world, the Last day, the Last times, the resurrection, the Day of the Lord and the Eschaton. End Time-based terms are also useful as generic substitutes for the many different terms that Bible scholars use when they discuss the teachings of Jesus about the End Times. The term End Time Judgment, for example, is a useful generic substitute for any of the many different terms, such as the Day of Judgment, the Last Judgment, the Last Day, the resurrection of damnation, and the wrath of God that scholars use when they discuss the teachings of Jesus about a Judgment or Day of Reckoning. Similarly, the term End Time Kingdom is a useful generic substitute for any of the many different terms, such as the kingdom of God, heaven, the kingdom of the Son of man, the resurrection of life, and salvation that scholars use when they discuss the teachings of Jesus about a kingdom where persons who are raised to everlasting life (or eternal life) will enjoy their reward.

Importantly, all End Time texts which include verses copied from the New Testament are followed by entries called Notes which cite and/or discuss other New or Old Testament texts that are related to them and, consequently, ought to be read and interpreted in conjunction with them. Especially important among texts of this kind are texts which include similar but differently worded accounts of things Jesus said on the same or similar subjects in other Gospels or in other parts of the same Gospel. Other examples of texts of this kind include Old Testament texts which Jesus quotes or alludes to in order to explain or support his sayings, prophecies and other teachings about the End Time. This is because reading these texts in conjunction with one another enables readers to study the End Times teachings or Eschatology of Jesus as a connected whole, and not just as collections of separate stand-alone units.

End Time Teachings of John the Baptist in the Gospel of John

John 1:19-23
P 19 And this is the record of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, Who art thou? 20 And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed, I am not the Christ. 21 And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith, I am not. Art thou that prophet? And he answered, No. 22 Then said they unto him, Who art thou? that we may give an answer to them that sent us. What sayest thou of thyself? 23 He said, I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord, as said the prophet Esaias.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 21's question about whether John is Elias alludes to v. 5-6 of Mal. 4:1-6, the last two verses of the King James Bible version of the Old Testament, in which God says he will send Elijah before the coming of "the great and dreadful day of the Lord". The latter term is one of the many different terms the KJV Bible uses to describe the Day of Judgment or, in the writer's preferred terminology, the End Time Judgment.
V. 21's question about whether John is "that prophet" alludes to v. 15 and 18 of Deut. 18:15-20, in which Moses says that God will raise up a Prophet like himself whom the people must obey or suffer divine retribution. It is unclear from the latter text, however, whether "that prophet" is a person who has anything to do with the coming of the Day of Judgment.
It does not follow from v. 21's description of John's denial that he is either Elias or "that prophet" that John does not regard himself as playing a role in the fulfillment of End Times prophecies about the Day of the Lord. This is because v. 23 describes John applying to himself v. 3 of Is. 40:1-11, an important End Times prophecy which foretells the coming of the Lord and the revealing of his glory to all flesh. See also v. 3 of Matt. 3:1-6, v. 3 of Mark 1:1-11 and v. 4 of Luke 3:4-6.
Jesus speaks about John the Baptist as Elias in v. 14 of Matt. 11:7-15, Matt. 17:10-13 and Mark 9:11-13, among others.

John 3:31-36
31 He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all. 32 And what he hath seen and heard, that he testifieth; and no man receiveth his testimony. 33 He that hath received his testimony hath set to his seal that God is true. 34 For he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God: for God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto him. 35 The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand. 36 He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him.   [end ch.]
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 36 teaches that people have one of two mutually exclusive future destinies: believing in the Son and having everlasting life or not believing in the Son and facing the wrath of God.
This text is also included as an End Time text because the things John says in v. 35 about the Father giving all things into the hands of the Son foreshadow the things Jesus teaches in v. 22 of John 5:19-29 below about God committing all judgment to the Son, a statement that would seem to include the End Time Judgment. Other verses of this kind include John 16:15 and 17:2. See also Matt. 11:27, Matt. 28:18 and Luke 10:22 of the KJV Bible.
This text is also of End Time interest because the things John says in v. 36 about the importance of belief to a person's salvation foreshadow the teachings of Jesus described in v. 15-18 of John 3:13-18 and in v. 16 of Mark 16:14-20.

End Time Teachings of Jesus in the Gospel of John

John 1:49-51
49 Nathanael answered and saith unto him, Rabbi, thou art the Son of God; thou art the King of Israel. 50 Jesus answered and said unto him, Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig tree, believest thou? thou shalt see greater things than these. 51 And he saith unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Hereafter ye shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man.   [end ch.]
V. 49-51 are included as an End Time text because Jesus not only does not object to, but also seems to approve of the things Nathaniel says about him in v. 49, namely, that he is the Son of God and the King of Israel. Being the Son of God, in turn, is important because John 5:19-29 describes Jesus teaching that the Son of God is the person whose voice will call the dead to life at the resurrection. Teachings of Jesus about the Son raising the dead on the Last Day are also described in v. 40 of John 6:35-44.  Finally, v. 35-37 of John 9:35-39 describe Jesus openly revealing that he is the Son of God.
The phrase "King of Israel" in v. 49 is arguably synonymous with "King of the Jews", a phrase that appears in all four Gospel accounts of Jesus' trial before Pilate. See Matt. 27:11-14, Mark 15:1-5, Luke 23:1-4 and John 18:28-37. See also Luke 1:26-33/32.
It seems reasonable to think that the angels Jesus speaks about in v. 51 are the same as those he speaks about in one or more of v. 40-41 of Matt. 13:36-43, v. 49-50 of Matt. 13:47-50, v. 27-28 of Matt. 16:24-28, v. 30-31 of Matt. 24:29-36 and v. 31-32 of Matt. 25:31-46, all of which describe teachings of Jesus about the Son of man and his angels in passages that relate to the coming of an End Time Judgment and/or End Time Kingdom.
V. 51 is the first verse of the Gospel of John that uses the phrase "the Son of man" in a sense that is of End Time interest. In the accompanying Auxiliary Sense file titled "Senses of Phrases Like Son of Man", the writer describes the senses in which the Bible uses phrases of this kind ("a son of man", "the son of man", etc.) and gives examples of Bible verses that use them in these senses.

John 3:2-8
2 The same [Nicodemus] came to Jesus by night, and said unto him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him. 3 Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. 4 Nicodemus saith unto him, How can a man be born when he is old? can he enter the second time into his mother's womb, and be born? 5 Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 7 Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again. 8 The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 3 and 5 describe Jesus teaching that people have one of two very different future destinies, i.e., seeing/entering the kingdom of God or being unable to enter that kingdom, depending on whether they have been born again. Interestingly, the Gospel of John usually describes the fate of those who are unable to enter the End Time Kingdom as "perishing", e.g., v. 15-16 of John 3:13-18. Matthew, on the other hand, usually describes this fate as being cast into fire (Matt. 13:42 and 50) or going into everlasting punishment (Matt. 25:46).
Unlike the other three Gospels, the Gospel of John uses the phrase "the kingdom of God" as such only twice, once each in v. 3 and 5 above. In addition, the Gospel of John does not use the phrase "the kingdom of heaven" as such even once.
Surprisingly, in spite of the frequency with which some Christians use it, the New Testament uses the phrase "born again" as such only in v. 3 and 6 above and in 1Pet. 1:23 (not included).

John 3:13-18
13 And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of man which is in heaven. P 14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: 15 That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life. P 16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. 17 For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. P 18 He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.
This text is a prime example of an End Time text because it includes several verses that describe teachings of Jesus about salvation and/or the mutually exclusive future destinies that will be decreed on the Day of Judgment. V. 15, for example, describes these destinies as perishing or having eternal life. V. 16 describes these destinies as perishing or having everlasting life. V. 17 describes these destinies as being condemned or being saved. Importantly, all of these verses seem to describe belief in the Son of man (v. 14-15) or Son of God (v. 16-18) as the deciding factor at the Judgment.
Other verses from the Gospel of John that describe teachings of Jesus about the importance of belief in him (or the Son of God, the Son, etc.) include v. 29 of John 6:26-29, v. 40 of John 6:35-44, v. 47 of John 6:47-58 and v. 25-26 of John 11:21-27. See, however, John 5:19-29, in which Jesus stresses the importance of belief "on him that sent me". Still other texts in which Jesus teaches things about the relationship between belief in him and belief in Him that sent him include John 12:44-50 and John 13:13-21. See also v. 16 of Mark 16:16-20.
V. 15 and 16 are the first of many verses in which he Gospel of John uses either the phrase "eternal life" or its apparent equivalent "everlasting life". In a few cases the Gospel of John reverses this order and uses the phrases "life eternal" or "life everlasting". The other three Gospels use phrases of these kinds only a few times, mostly in the Gospels of Mark and Luke. Surprisingly, the Old Testament uses only one of these phrases (everlasting life), and uses this phrase only once (in v. 2 of Dan. 12:1-4) in spite of the fact that it uses the word "everlasting" 65 times with words other than "life".
V. 16 and 18 above are the only New Testament verses that describe Jesus using the words, "only begotten Son" (of God) as such. Based on v. 33 of Acts 13:26-37 (not included), these words seem to be based on v. 7 of Ps. 2:1-9.
In the KJV Bible version of the Old Testament, forms of the word "perish" are typically used in passages that describe persons and things that are destroyed, consumed, devoured, etc. See, for example, v. 3-6 of Ps. 9:1-8, v. 20 of Ps. 37:16-20, v. 14 of Is. 26:12-21 and v. 11-12 of Is. 41:9-16. Interestingly, in Is. 41:11-12, "perish" clearly means "be as nothing".
The parallelisms between v. 15-16 on the one hand and v. 17-18 on the other suggest that Jesus meant the terms "perish" and "have life" to be a contrast pair which conveys basically the same idea as the contrast pair "condemned" and "saved".

John 5:19-29
19 Then answered Jesus and said unto them [the Jews], Verily, verily, I say unto you, The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do: for what things soever he doeth, these also doeth the Son likewise. 20 For the Father loveth the Son, and sheweth him all things that himself doeth: and he will shew him greater works than these, that ye may marvel. 21 For as the Father raiseth up the dead, and quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will. 22 For the Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son: 23 That all men should honour the Son, even as they honour the Father. He that honoureth not the Son honoureth not the Father which hath sent him. 24 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. 25 Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live. 26 For as the Father hath life in himself; so hath he given to the Son to have life in himself; 27 And hath given him authority to execute judgment also, because he is the Son of man. 28 Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, 29 And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation.
This text is reasonably regarded as one of the most important End Time texts that appear in the KJV Bible version of the Gospel of John. This is because, together with John 6:35-44 below, it provides this Gospel's most complete description of the teachings of Jesus about the Last Day. One of the most important of these is described in v. 24-25 and 27-29, namely, that the Last Day and its rewards and punishments are closely associated with the resurrection of the dead.
V. 22's statement that "the Father judgeth no man" seems difficult to reconcile with the many Old Testament texts that speak of God as the judge. See, for example, v. 22 of Is. 33:20-22, v. 30 of Ezek. 18:25-32 and v. 22 of Ezek. 34:6-24.
Unlike v. 15-16 and 18 of John 3:13-18 above, v. 24 describes Jesus saying that having everlasting life and not coming into condemnation requires that a person "hear" his word and believe "on him that sent" him. Other texts in which Jesus speaks about the relationship between belief in him and belief in Him that sent him include v. 29 of John 6:26-29, v. 40 of John 6:35-44, v. 47 of John 6:47-58, v. 25-26 of John 11:21-27, v. 44-46 of John 12:44-50 and v. 20 of John 13:13-21.
The voice mentioned in v. 25 and 28 above may be the same as the voice mentioned in v. 27-28 of John 10:24-31 below.
In v. 25 Jesus states, "they that hear shall live". In v. 28-29 Jesus states, "all that are in the graves shall hear...And shall come forth". It is unclear how these teachings of Jesus about the resurrection can be reconciled with v. 2 of Dan. 12:1-4, which states, "And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake,some to everlasting life, and someto shame and everlasting contempt.".  [Emphasis added.]
V. 25 and 27 together suggest that the phrases "Son of God" and "Son of man" refer to the same person. Other phrases that are synonymous with "Son of God" are discussed in Notes included with John 11:21-27 below.
The phrases "resurrection of life" and "resurrection of damnation" in v. 29 may convey substantially the same idea as the arguably parallel phrases "everlasting life" and "everlasting contempt" in v. 2 of Dan. 12:1-4.
V. 24 and 29 describe Jesus teaching that the reward of those judged to "have done good" is to have everlasting life (v. 24) or come forth to the resurrection of life (v. 29), and that the punishment of those judged to "have done evil" is to come into condemnation (v. 24) or come forth to the resurrection of damnation (v. 29). Interestingly, however, the Gospel of John does not describe Jesus using the word "hell" even once, and describes him using the word "fire" only once in a verse that is unclear about the nature and duration of this punishment, namely, v. 6 of John 15:1-6.
While the Old Testament never uses the word "resurrection" as such, it does include texts that describe a raising of at least some of the dead. See, for example, Is. 26:12-21 and Ezek. 37:1-14. See also the use of the word "awake" in v. 2 of Dan. 12:1-4.

John 6:35-44
35 And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. 36 But I said unto you, That ye also have seen me, and believe not. 37 All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. 38 For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me. 39 And this is the Father's will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day. 40 And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day. 41 The Jews then murmured at him, because he said, I am the bread which came down from heaven. 42 And they said, Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? how is it then that he saith, I came down from heaven? 43 Jesus therefore answered and said unto them, Murmur not among yourselves. 44 No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day.
The persons that Jesus describes the Father giving him in v. 37 and 39 would seem to include persons he will raise up on the Last Day (v. 40). Other texts which describe teachings of Jesus about the Father and persons that the Father has given to him include John 10:24-31 and John 17:1-12.
V. 38, 39, 40 and 44 above all describe Jesus saying that he was sent by the Father. In the Synoptic Gospels there are only a few verses that describe Jesus making similar statements. See Matt. 10:40 and 15:24, Mark 9:37, and Luke 4:43 and 9:48.
Along with John 3:14-18, John 6:26-29 and John 6:47-58, v. 40 describes Jesus teaching that belief on (or in) him is necessary for a person to have everlasting life. V. 24 of John 5:19-29, on the other hand, describes him stressing the importance of hearing his word and believing "on him that sent me". Other passages from the Gospel of John which describe teachings of these kinds include John 11:25-26, John 12:44-46 and John 13:20.
V. 39, 40 and 44 comprise three of the six New Testament verses which couple the term "the last day" with references to the raising, resurrection or judgment of the dead. The other three verses are John 6:54, John 11:24 and John 12:48.
The term "the last day" seems to be related to the term "the last days", a term that the Old Testament uses only twice, once in v. 2 of Is. 2:2-4 and once in v. 1 of Mic. 4:1-8. Interestingly, these two passages use almost the same words.
V. 44 is of special End Time interest because it suggests that the Father, by choosing who will be drawn to Jesus, in effect chooses the persons who will be saved, an idea that arguably supports the idea some Christians call Predestination. See also v. 65 of John 6:61-65. Curiously, v. 6 of John 14:1-7 seems to apply a similar idea, but in reverse.

John 6:47-58
47 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life. 48 I am that bread of life. 49 Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead. 50 This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die. 51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world. 52 The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us his flesh to eat? 53 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you. 54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. 55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. 56 He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him. 57 As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me. 58 This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.
This text is included as an End Time text because v. 47, like v. 15-16 of John 3:13-18 and v. 40 of John 6:35-44, describes Jesus teaching that belief on (or in) him is necessary for a person to be judged worthy of having everlasting (or eternal) life. In v. 24 of John 5:19-29 above, on the other hand, Jesus stresses the importance of hearing his word and believing "on him that sent me,". Other passages which describe teachings of Jesus about the role belief plays in salvation include v. 25-26 of John 11:21-27, v. 44-46 of John 12:44-50, v. 20 of John 13:13-21 and v. 16 of Mark 16:14-20.
While v. 47 and the texts discussed in the previous Note describe Jesus speaking about the relationship between believing in him and having everlasting life, v. 50-51 and v. 58 above describe him speaking about himself as the bread that enables a person to not die or live for ever. Other passages from the Gospel of John which describe teachings of Jesus about not dying or living for ever include v. 51 of John 8:48-51, v. 28 of John 10:24-31 and v. 26 of John 11:21-27.
V. 53 is of End Time interest because, in context, it makes clear that Jesus and the Son of man are the same person.
This text is also included as an End Time text because v. 54 seems to describe Jesus teaching that the eternal life he promises people will begin when he raises them up on the Last Day. (If a person's eternal life were to begin immediately after his death, what would remain to be done on a Last Day that arrives many centuries later?) Another possibility is that Jesus expected the Last Day to arrive so soon that no one, dead or alive, would have to wait much longer for its coming.
If v. 54 does mean that Jesus will raise up those who are judged worthy to have eternal life on the Last Day, it is unclear what would happen to persons who are still alive on that Day and who have been promised that they would live for ever (v. 58) and not die (v. 50) See also v. 25-26 of John 11:21-27.

See  TABLE OF CONTENTS  to read or download complete copies of all files
Useful Search Terms

Jesus and the End Times


Teachings of Jesus about End Times


Teachings of Jesus about Salvation


Eschatology of Jesus in KJV Bible


Eschatology of Jesus in Gospel of John


End Times Teachings of Jesus


Jesus and the Last Day


Jesus and the Day of Judgment


Jesus and Resurrection